finder's fee Definition | Business Dictionaries from AllBusiness.com
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Business Definition for: finder's fee
finder's fee

fee charged by a person or company acting as a finder (intermediary) in a transaction.

finder's fee

  1. fee paid by a lender to a broker, or sometimes by a borrower to a broker, for obtaining a loan, usually a mortgage, or for referring business to a lender.
  2. fee paid by a lender to a third party and sometimes to a bank's own customers, for referring new business.
  3. in real estate, a commission paid to a broker for locating a property.
  4. in securities, a fee paid by an investment banker to someone who brings in a deal.

finder's fee

In general: fee paid to an individual or company whose function is to bring together the parties involved in a business deal. The finder will often serve as an intermediary until the deal is consummated. The fee is usually a percentage of either the profit created by the deal or the value of the deal, but it may also be a flat rate paid by one or all of the parties involved.
Advertising: fee paid by an advertising agency to the individual or firm responsible for bringing a large account into the agency.

finder's fee

monetary sum paid to an intermediary who acts as the contact between the lender (an insurance company) and the borrower.

finder's fee

In general: fee paid to an individual or company whose function is to bring together the parties involved in a business deal. The finder will often serve as an intermediary until the deal is consummated. The fee is usually based on either a percentage of the profit created by the deal or the value of the deal, but it may also be a flat rate paid by one or all of the parties involved.
Advertising: fee paid by an advertising agency to the individual or firm responsible for bringing a large account into the agency.

finder's fee

money paid to someone other than a broker who locates suitable property or a purchaser. Prohibited or limited in most states.

Example: Broker Abel has a listing on a particular property. Baker knows several people interested in such property. Abel arranges with Baker to provide a finder's fee should one of the prospects identified by Baker purchase the property.

Copyright © 2006, 2003, 1998, 1995, 1991, 1987, 1985 by Barron's Educational Series, Inc. Reprinted by arrangement with Publisher.
Copyright c 2006, 2000, 1997, 1993, 1990 by Barron's Educational Series, Inc. Reprinted by arrangement with Publisher.
Copyright © 2007, 2000, 1997, 1987, by Barron's Educational Series, Inc. Reprinted by arrangement with Publisher.
Copyright © 2000, 1995, 1991, 1987 by Barron's Educational Series, Inc. Reprinted by arrangement with Publisher.
Copyright c 2000, 1994, 1987 by Barron's Educational Series, Inc. Reprinted by arrangement with Publisher.
Copyright © 2004, 2000, 1997, 1993, 1987, 1984 by Barron's Educational Series, Inc. Reprinted by arrangement with Publisher.

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